From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

RACONTER DES SALADES

 

 

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Literally: to tell salads

The equivalent I found seems too British to me: spinning yarns

Your Turn!

What do you say?

 

See you on Monday for the letter T, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

RIRE COMME UNE BALEINE

 

 

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Literally: laugh like a whale

Best equivalent: laugh one’s head off

 

See you tomorrow for the letter S, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

COUPER LES CHEVEUX EN QUATRE

 

 

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Literally: cut hair in four pieces

Best equivalent: nitpick

 

Being precise and meticulous is asked from a hairstylist. But too much can be too much for other things in life, right?

 

See you tomorrow for the letter R, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

METTRE LES PIEDS DANS LE PLAT

 

 

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Literally: to put one’s feet in the dish

Best equivalent: to mess up

 

When someone starts talking in a very unfiltered way about something everybody was careful to avoid, the French say he or she met les pieds dans le plat.

 

See you tomorrow for the letter Q, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

S’OCCUPER (OU) SE MÊLER DE SES OIGNONS

 

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Literally: to care about one’s own onions

Best equivalent: mind one’s own business

 

The expression could have American origins. In the 1920s, many onion species grew in the U.S. People who worked in this field developed skills to learn how to distinguish the different kinds. Soon, they minded about their particular species, which became their exclusive business. Who knows for sure? What is sure, however, is that the French expression is used to remind someone to mind her/his own business.

The French can also say: Ce ne sont pas tes oignons. Literally: they are not your onions. In both expressions, oignons never designate onions but anything related to personal business.

 

See you tomorrow for the letter P, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

 

LES DOIGTS DANS LE NEZ

 

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Literally: fingers in the nose

Best equivalent: hands down

 

When something is very easy to do, the French often say: les doigts dans le nez, implying that it’s so simple you have time to put your fingers in your nose while accomplishing the task. Here in the States, we are a little less graphic 🙂

 

See you tomorrow for the letter O, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

 

AVOIR LA MAIN VERTE

 

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Literally: Have the green hand

Perfect equivalent: Have the green thumb

 

This expression doesn’t need any explanation.

For once, the French and the Americans fully agree.

Almost 🙂

 

See you Monday with the letter N, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

LÂCHER LES BASKETS

 

 

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Literally: Let go off the baskets (remember: baskets are sneakers in French)

Best equivalent: Give a break (to someone)

 

Lâche-moi les baskets, for example, would be “give me a break,” or “get off my back.”

 

See you tomorrow for the letter M, part of the A to Z challenge!

 

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

C’EST PARTI, MON KIKI!

 

Literally: It left, my Kiki.

Best equivalents: Here we go! We’re off.

 

The noun Kiki in French can also be used to designate the throat. But in this expression, it’s unrelated.

 

See you tomorrow with the letter L, part of the A to Z challenge!

From A to Z, Twenty-Six Funny, Weird, Vivid French Expressions

JALOUX COMME UN POU

 

 

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Literally: As jealous as lice

Best equivalent: Green-eyed, green with envy

Do I need to explain more? Anyone who has dealt with lice knows how territorial the parasites can be.

As always, if you know an American English expression that would match the French expression du jour, go for it!

 

See you tomorrow with the letter K, part of the A to Z challenge!

 

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